Setting Up

EVO 4 Audio Loop-back

In this article, we’ll cover the basics of setting up EVO 4’s loop-back function and some common use cases where you may wish to use it.

 

 

The loop-back feature enables you to record your computer audio alongside your microphones in your audio software. Imagine plugging some cables from the main outputs of EVO 4 and bringing them straight back into the inputs so you could record the audio from your computer.

 

 

This is exactly what the loop-back feature is doing, but it all happens internally, without the need for cables, and while still allowing you to use your mic inputs for recording. This means your computer’s audio can be recorded on separate channels to your microphones, enabling you to take more control over your audio when it comes to editing and mixing in your software.

An example of where this would be useful is if you are creating a podcast and want to interview someone via Skype and record that conversation, or maybe you have a gaming YouTube channel or want to stream yourself playing a game with computer audio as well as your microphone, while still using EVO 4 to listen to everything on headphones.

 

EVO can loop-back audio from two sources, either from your main output, so the audio that is coming out of your headphones or speakers. Alternatively, you can use two virtual inputs and outputs called loop-back 1+2, which keeps it separate from the audio you are listening through on your Speakers or headphones.

 

The first step is setting your computer to output sound to the loop-back outputs of EVO 4, the virtual outputs. On some software, you can change this in the software itself in the settings. If you’re unsure on how this is done. we’d recommend contacting the developer of your software or reading through it’s manual.

 

Otherwise, for software that doesn’t allow you to set the output channel, such as web browsers or video call services, you may need to adjust your sound output setting on your computer itself.

 

The steps on how to do this for both Mac and PC are below:

Windows

On Windows, go to Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Sound and select the Playback tab.

 

In the list of output devices, find loop-back 1+2, select it and then click Set Default Device” Applications will then default to sending audio to the loop-back output.

On Windows, it’s important to ensure that the sample rate of your audio software and your computer are the same. Double click on the loop-back 1+2 output and go to the Advanced tab, Then select the correct sample rate for your audio software, using the 24bit option.

 

If you aren’t sure what sample rate you are using, then it is usually found in the software preferences or project settings menus, otherwise, it would be best to look up how to check in your audio software manual.

So now you have our virtual output playing audio, now need to loop it back to the virtual inputs so your audio software can see the audio.

 

To do this, go to the EVO app menu in the menu bar and click Set loop-back Source. Now select loop-back Send as your loop-back source.

Now open up your recording or streaming software and select loop-back 1+2 as your Input. This may appear as either loop-back 1+2 or just as Inputs 3+4.

Now you can set up a channel for your microphone on input one and two, hit record and you will capture both your mic and computer audio perfectly.

 

If your audio software output is set to your regular outputs 1+2, you will be able to monitor the computer audio, as well as making use of EVO 4’s monitoring features like Monitor Mix, letting you listen to your microphone with zero latency.

mac OS

First, you need to open Audio MIDI Setup, so go to finder and click Applications -> Utilities -> Audio MIDI Setup.

 

Select EVO 4 from the list of devices and select Configure Speakers

Set your left and right output to loop-back 1 (L) and loop-back 2 (R). Now any audio played from your Mac will be sent through the loop-back send.

Now the audio is being fed to the virtual loop-back channel, you now need to loop it back to the virtual inputs so your audio software can see the audio.

 

To do this, go to the EVO app menu in the menu bar and click Set loop-back Source. Now select loop-back Send as your loop-back source.

Now that the loop-back is set up, you would then simply need to open the software you will be using to capture or stream the audio and set your audio input to the loop-back inputs.

 

Depending on your software, this may appear as loop-back 1+2 or just as Input 3+4.

Now you can set up a channel for your microphone on input one or two, hit record and you will capture both your mic and computer audio perfectly.

 

If your audio software output is set to your regular outputs 1+2, you will be able to monitor the computer audio, as well as making use of EVO 4’s monitoring features like Monitor Mix, letting you listen to your microphone with zero latency.

EVO 4 Audio Loop-back

In this article, we’ll cover the basics of setting up EVO 4’s loop-back function and some common use cases where you may wish to use it.

 

 

The loop-back feature enables you to record your computer audio alongside your microphones in your audio software. Imagine plugging some cables from the main outputs of EVO 4 and bringing them straight back into the inputs so you could record the audio from your computer.

 

 

This is exactly what the loop-back feature is doing, but it all happens internally, without the need for cables, and while still allowing you to use your mic inputs for recording. This means your computer’s audio can be recorded on separate channels to your microphones, enabling you to take more control over your audio when it comes to editing and mixing in your software.

An example of where this would be useful is if you are creating a podcast and want to interview someone via Skype and record that conversation, or maybe you have a gaming YouTube channel or want to stream yourself playing a game with computer audio as well as your microphone, while still using EVO 4 to listen to everything on headphones.

 

EVO can loop-back audio from two sources, either from your main output, so the audio that is coming out of your headphones or speakers. Alternatively, you can use two virtual inputs and outputs called loop-back 1+2, which keeps it separate from the audio you are listening through on your Speakers or headphones.

 

The first step is setting your computer to output sound to the loop-back outputs of EVO 4, the virtual outputs. On some software, you can change this in the software itself in the settings. If you’re unsure on how this is done. we’d recommend contacting the developer of your software or reading through it’s manual.

 

Otherwise, for software that doesn’t allow you to set the output channel, such as web browsers or video call services, you may need to adjust your sound output setting on your computer itself.

 

The steps on how to do this for both Mac and PC are below:

Windows

On Windows, go to Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Sound and select the Playback tab.

 

In the list of output devices, find loop-back 1+2, select it and then click Set Default Device” Applications will then default to sending audio to the loop-back output.

On Windows, it’s important to ensure that the sample rate of your audio software and your computer are the same. Double click on the loop-back 1+2 output and go to the Advanced tab, Then select the correct sample rate for your audio software, using the 24bit option.

 

If you aren’t sure what sample rate you are using, then it is usually found in the software preferences or project settings menus, otherwise, it would be best to look up how to check in your audio software manual.

So now you have our virtual output playing audio, now need to loop it back to the virtual inputs so your audio software can see the audio.

 

To do this, go to the EVO app menu in the menu bar and click Set loop-back Source. Now select loop-back Send as your loop-back source.

Now open up your recording or streaming software and select loop-back 1+2 as your Input. This may appear as either loop-back 1+2 or just as Inputs 3+4.

Now you can set up a channel for your microphone on input one and two, hit record and you will capture both your mic and computer audio perfectly.

 

If your audio software output is set to your regular outputs 1+2, you will be able to monitor the computer audio, as well as making use of EVO 4’s monitoring features like Monitor Mix, letting you listen to your microphone with zero latency.

mac OS

First, you need to open Audio MIDI Setup, so go to finder and click Applications -> Utilities -> Audio MIDI Setup.

 

Select EVO 4 from the list of devices and select Configure Speakers

Set your left and right output to loop-back 1 (L) and loop-back 2 (R). Now any audio played from your Mac will be sent through the loop-back send.

Now the audio is being fed to the virtual loop-back channel, you now need to loop it back to the virtual inputs so your audio software can see the audio.

 

To do this, go to the EVO app menu in the menu bar and click Set loop-back Source. Now select loop-back Send as your loop-back source.

Now that the loop-back is set up, you would then simply need to open the software you will be using to capture or stream the audio and set your audio input to the loop-back inputs.

 

Depending on your software, this may appear as loop-back 1+2 or just as Input 3+4.

Now you can set up a channel for your microphone on input one or two, hit record and you will capture both your mic and computer audio perfectly.

 

If your audio software output is set to your regular outputs 1+2, you will be able to monitor the computer audio, as well as making use of EVO 4’s monitoring features like Monitor Mix, letting you listen to your microphone with zero latency.